What Are A Baby’s Eye Development Milestones?

As soon as a baby is born, visual stimulation begins. A baby’s surroundings provide constant information to them even before they are able to do much else like talk, walk, or sit upright. At birth, a baby’s eyes will still need to develop further to fully function as intended. How so? Read this week’s article all about baby eye development milestones. 

The first people a baby will attach to is its parents, and there is a good reason why!

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A baby’s eyes will develop even after birth. Initially, things like color, distance, and focus are not very good. However, development occurs quickly. We have broken down some of the major stages below:

0 – 4 Months:

  • A newborn’s vision is quite blurry at first. They are able to detect motion and light.
  • Babies cannot see very far, only about 8-12 inches from their face. This is why a baby will begin to recognize and form a relationship with his or her parents first because this is who is seen the most. Kind of awesome, right?
  • It is common for babies to appear cross-eyed, this is because they are still learning to focus their eyes. This should correct its self by the 3-month. If it doesn’t, you should consult your child’s eye care professional.
  • Around the 3-month mark, babies will have learned how to focus their eyes so they can follow an object. As time progresses, a babies ability to focus and track objects increases.
  • Initially, babies only see in black, white, and shades of gray. Showing your little one bold, contrasting objects will intrigue her at this age. Your baby will begin to see color well around the end of the 4-month mark.

5 – 8 Months

  • alina-sofia-127298Your baby will begin to see in 3D! In other words, your baby will begin to recognized depth perception. By using her eyes together she will be able to understand object distance and size. Pretty cool stuff!
  • Vast improvement in color vision.
  • Improvement in hand-eye-coordination. This is further developed as babies begin to crawl, and might we add put the smallest of things into their mouths! Probably, because at the 6-month mark they can pretty much see ‘normally’ or in medical terms see 20/20.

 

9 – 12 Months

  • Your baby’s depth perception will have vastly improved. Babies at this stage can pull themselves up, and even throw objects with some precision.
  • Hand-eye coordination will have also greatly developed. Babies will be able to use their hands to hold objects.

12+ Months

  • Familiar faces and objects will be recognizable to your child. A popular game among children at this age is hide-and-seek!
  • Hand-eye coordination and depth perception will be well developed. Your little one is probably very keen to explore her new world. You can help her by providing lots of opportunities to explore in a safe and comfortable environment. It is important to remember as your child becomes more mobile, the chances for an eye injury also increase. Taking precautionary steps, and keeping a close eye on her can help reduce this risk.

Why Are Regular Eye Exams Important For Children?

Do you know when your child’s first eye appointment should be? Read all about it here! It is extremely important that children make their regular eye exams. If any issues or concerns are present, your eye doctor can implement a treatment plan sooner than later! In certain conditions, like a lazy eye, starting treatment earlier allows for the best success. Because signs your child is having trouble seeing are not always obvious, a comprehensive eye exam is needed to uncover problems. Also, it is important to remember the health of the eyes is just as important as ensuring your child can see clearly. Both can greatly affect their confidence, learning, and among other things ability to socialize. So, don’t delay a visit to your local Victoria eye doctor!

Do you have questions and or concerns about your babies eye development? Give us a call or book online with Dr. Sharma.

We love helping our youngest patients’ see their very best!

 

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